Categorized | Composers & Atists

ORFEO New Releases on 18 CDs: Wilhelm Furtwängler – Wiener Philharmoniker – Wiener Konzerte 1944 – 1954

Posted on 17 February 2013 by admin

C 834 118 Y

Wilhelm Furtwängler is actually one of the greatest symphonic and operatic conductors of the 20th century. As a major guest conductor of  the Vienna Philharmonic from 1944/45. Under his direction the Vienna Philharmonic made a whole series of radio recordings that have now, for the first time, been carefully edited under the auspices of the Furtwängler specialist Gottfried Kraus and released by Orfeo on 18 CDs. The series including one of Mozart’s g-minor symphony K 550 in which Furtwängler demonstrates his clear sense of form from the very first bars onwards. Beethoven’s third Leonore Overture and an excerpt from Schubert’sRosamunde music complete our selection from this, the earliest of the recording sessions. Several works are to be found more than once in this anthology. Thus, for example, Beethoven’s Eroica can be compared in an early version from 1944 and a later recording from 1953, just as Bruckner’s Eighth can be compared in recordings from 1944 and 1954. Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony is offered no less than three times here – from the years 1951, 1952 and 1953 – a work that surely no other conductor could make into such an “event”, an experience of universal import, as could Wilhelm Furtwängler. This was also true of his Brahms interpretations, represented here by the first two symphonies, the Haydn Variations, the Double Concerto and the German Requiem, which is sadly only extant in an incomplete recording from 1951. This is, incidentally, the only time in this collection that we hear Furtwängler conducting the Vienna Symphony Orchestra. Besides Irmgard Seefried and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau – two vocal soloists whom Furtwängler admired and engaged repeatedly – we can hear the chorus of the Vienna Singakademie on this recording. They also sing in Bach’s St Matthew Passion: in a partial recording from 1952 and in the famous performance of 1954 that was shortened by Furtwängler himself, but which is here released in a restored recording based on the original radio broadcast, without the cuts that were later made by record companies. Here as elsewhere in this collection, the acoustic heritage of the Viennese radio stations of the time has been restored using the best possible technological means available today. Even collector’s items such as the piano concertos K 365 and 482 by Mozart, with the soloists Dagmar Bella and Paul Badura-Skoda, have probably never sounded better since they were first heard in the concert hall. Thus justice is done to Furtwängler’s “timeless” style of music-making that unites different epochs, ranging from Gluck’s Overture to Iphigenie in Aulis to Mahler’s Songs of a Wayfarer and Furtwängler’s own Second Symphony – a work that despite all its late-Romantic echoes succeeds in attaining originality and a considerable emotional impact. This universality of Furtwängler has not found its match to this day.

Salzburger Orchesterkonzerte 1949-1954

Price: $99.34

(0 customer reviews)

1 used & new available from $99.34

2 Comments For This Post

  1. Price of Cormar Sensation Says:

    Hello my friend! I want to say that this article is awesome, nice written and come with approximately all important infos. I’d like to peer extra posts like this .

  2. gta iv pc version Says:

    Check out the easiest way to download its
    free full version for the Windows PC. already gives no physical duplicates
    of games, and just provides a direct download on the
    game. It opens with a bank robbery in which Luis is held hostage by GTA4 protagonist Niko Bellic and crew
    then takes you on a non stop thrill ride with many interesting
    characters.

1 Trackbacks For This Post

  1. Howdy Says:

    I really like what you did with the blog here!…

———————————-

Life Is Like An Exciting Movement, And Everyday Starts A New Bagatelle.

About C.Daily

Valuable Classical Newsletter│About Musicians & Compositions Related to Classical Music Eras│Contact at Info@ClassicalDaily.com