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Jean Mouton,Missa Dictes moy toutes voz pensees on GIMELL

Posted on 13 March 2013 by admin

Mouton: Missa Dictes moy toutes voz pensees

Jean Mouton,Missa Dictes moy toutes voz pensees on GIMELL

Jean Mouton (c. 1459 – 30 October 1522) was a French composer of the Renaissance. He was famous both for his motets, which are among the most refined of the time,  and Mouton may have been the editor of the illuminated manuscript known as the Medici Codex, one of the primary manuscript sources of the time. Mouton was a fine musical craftsman throughout his life, his compositions underpin an incredible lyricism and sweetness of tone with music of the utmost in mathematical complexity. The disc sound (in the lovely acoustic of Merton College Chapel, Oxford) is outstanding and the notes are readable and interesting. This excellent recording being provided both sharp focus and a sense of spaciousness and depth.

Mouton: Missa Dictes moy toutes voz pensees

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The late Renaissance composer Carlo Gesualdo’s forgotten work performed and recorded for the first time in 400 years

Posted on 10 February 2013 by admin

‘I had little idea at the outset just how difficult the task of reconstruction would be, and indeed there were many moments when I was tempted to concede defeat,’ said Wood. ‘However, my determination was fuelled on the one hand by the excitement of bringing these masterful and visionary pieces back to life after 400 years of oblivion, and on the other by the stimulation which came from discovering so many secrets within a compositional technique of such phenomenal strength and sophistication, and from which I, as a composer even four centuries later, could learn so much.’

Harmonia Mundi is commemorating the 400th anniversary of the death of composer Carlo Gesualdo in 2013 with the release of a previously undiscovered work. The Sacrae Cantiones Liber secundus – the composer’s second book of motets for six and seven voices – has not been performed in 400 years because both the bassus and sextus parts were missing. However, thanks to three years of painstaking research and reconstruction by composer and conductor James Wood who leads Vocalconsort Berlin on the album, the work has been recorded for the first time as it might have been sung in 1603.

The album is due to be released on Monday, February 11, 2013.

By  Gramophone new

 

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English Renaissance composer, singer, and lutenist,John Dowland

Posted on 08 February 2013 by admin

JOHN DOWLAND  

(1563 – 1626)

John Dowland, of English or possibly Irish origin, was born in 1563, probably in London. He was a lutenist of distinction but failed, allegedly because he was a Catholic, to win a position in the royal service, seeking his fortune abroad at Kassel and later, in 1598, at the court of Christian IV of Denmark. He was forced by debt to return to England in 1606 and eventually won appointment as one of the King’s Lutes in 1612. He performed during the funeral ceremonies of King James I and himself died the following year. Dowland was the composer, in particular, of one of the best-known songs of the period, Flow, my teares, music much imitated and epitomising the fashionable humour of the day: melancholy. Dowland himself provided an apt pun on his own name—‘Dowland, semper dolens’ (‘Dowland, always grieving’)—although he had a reputation as a cheerful man, despite being professionally embittered by his long failure to find employment at the English court.

Vocal Music

Dowland was above all the composer of lute songs, publishing his first collection of airs in 1597, followed by a second in 1600 and a third in 1603. He left over 80 secular songs and these include Come again: sweet love doth now enditeFine knacks for ladiesand Flow, my teares, among many others of moving intensity.

Lute Music

For the lute itself Dowland wrote fantasias, and dance movements including pavanes, galliards, almains and jigs.

Other Instrumental Music

The best known of Dowland’s instrumental compositions is his famous Lachrimae or Seaven Teares, for five viols and lute. This work includes a series of dance movements, chiefly galliards, and solemn pavanes, using the theme familiar from the lute song Flow, my teares.

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The Renaissance covers the period from 1400 to 1600

Posted on 08 February 2013 by admin

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